Tag Archives: Punk

“Loose Luxury” – Fall 14 – @Louis_Boston

For the first time since I’ve been in this business, I find that the evolution of fashion has moved us into a moment of androgynous, and/or ambisexual dressing. I suppose you could say punk and deconstruction flirted with the notion, but today any distinctly feminine element you may have found there have all but been omitted.

It’s no secret that I’ve been attracted for some time now to the casual, luxury, athletic inspired designs that line the racks at Louis, and as we move into fall, that tone continues to evolve. A lot of the new pieces arriving here hold on to those sensibilities, but increasingly they are embracing androgynous qualities that effortlessly accompany them. And it’s been interesting to observe our customers as they approach the new season because I’m finding the pieces I have bought, whether cut for men or women, show very little difference in the nuance of the design, yet they are being very well received and appreciated by both sexes.

In particular, pieces from Baha East and Greg Lauren.

Baja East, the recently launched brainchild of Scott Studenberg and John Targon is a new line to Louis. Studenberg and Targon met while working on the wholesale side of the businesss for Lanvin, and Celine and Burberry respectively, and come to us in Boston with what is only their second collection.

Creating clothing that “everyone wants to wear all of the time,” the pair has coined their look “loose luxury” and produce pieces that are easy and casual, but finished in luxurious fabrics.

From their sleeveless hoodie made out of the softest glove leather you will ever lay your hands on, to another made from luxurious pony hair – I saw the collection in their showroom in New York, and I knew you had to have it.

Greg Lauren, Ralph’s nephew, has also created quite a buzz at Louis with his incredible distressed pieces. Since 2011 he has been finding vintage army duffle bags and tents at flea markets and vintage dealers, and manipulating them to create collections full of astonishing contradictions. The pieces for men and women differentiate a bit, but I didn’t buy that way for the season. Instead I bought similar pieces for everyone. His cashmere patchwork coats look and feel like nothing you’ve ever seen before and his exquisite, yet casual pants have sold out for women and soon will for men.

And while I would like to say the success of both lines at Louis should be attributed to my good taste, that’s honestly not the case. It’s truly just the confluences of things that are going on right now. With no other real way to describe it, pieces from both designers are just very “now,” and that kind of says it all.

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Make no mistake about it, the mainstream industry at large doesn’t quite know how to describe it either, but they are determined. True to form, the fashion rags (magazines and trade publications) want so badly to talk about this new incarnation of luxury, but they first need to categorize it and make it accessible to everyone by lining it up nicely along side of the “athletic” inspired brands of the moment (think LuLu). And while one could argue that there are shared components as things relate to comfort, the Common Project sneakers and the elements of Baja East and Greg Lauren are truly in a category unto themselves, yet there is nothing categorical about any of it.

Not to mention the fact that each and every garment produced is made purposefully, by hand, one at a time. And you won’t know what that means in terms of unique look and delicious feel if you are shopping from your computer. You simply have to try it on. The garments are made to drape differently on every body. You really have to throw out your ideas about traditional sizing because some prefer these pieces more fitted, and others with a little more room. Either way they look fabulous but they have to be tried on.

And this is what I’m referring to when I speak about the evolution and movement in fashion. Your jeans are an option, but now they are only that…an option. If you embrace new ideas and are open to evolving the way you think about clothing it’s inevitable that you’ll find pieces that may not replace your favorite jeans, but they will certainly make you think twice before automatically reaching for them. You have options now – Incredible, luxurious, forward thinking, innovative, versatile, striking options.

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Nothing thrills me more than when a customer comes to Louis, sees what we have to offer them, and understands the philosophy behind it. They get it.

Just last week a woman came in and grabbed a pair of Greg Lauren pants that were washed and dyed to give them a very unique look and texture. She put them on her body and her face lit up. Before we had a chance to explain anything to her she was explaining to us how she would wear them with heels or sneakers, and dress them up or down as the occasion dictated. When she said she thought they would look great if she wore them under a silk slip for an evening out I couldn’t hold back my smile. She had to have those pants. She got it.

These pieces that embrace “loose luxury” represent a new way of dressing and a new generation. The designers are really putting their stamp on things and owning something fresh that is also holding steadfastly on to luxury and elegance.

When you come to Louis I want you to discover incredible pieces and understand that you can use them in ways you never would have considered before.

I want you to invest in a wardrobe you actually want to wear…

And I promise you will.

 

Baja East

Baja East

Baja East

Baja East

Baja East

Baja East

Greg Lauren

Greg Lauren

Greg Lauren

Greg Lauren

Greg Lauren shirt, Belvest jacket, Haider Ackermann pants

Greg Lauren shirt, Belvest jacket, Haider Ackermann pants

photo 1

One Style Does Not Fit All

Rhetoric (n.): The art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing…

There’s an evolution going on in fashion, and my hope is that you’ll take the time to find the pieces that have meaning to you, before the rhetoric of new trends are spoon-fed to you from the pages of magazines.

While those glossies have always been around, and serve a great purpose to many, it’s important to understand that most of the trends they write about are manufactured by an industry to suit the season.

In other words, it’s no secret that some women (and men for that matter) are being force-fed a “one style fits all” mentality. And clearly our society is NOT one style fits all. Not every body is meant to fit in skinny jeans, and not every breast was meant to be revealed in a skin-tight top. I understand that yoga pants are a “thing,” but there’s a time and a place. We don’t all want to see an ass wrapped in spandex while in line at the dry cleaners. (I’m sorry, but it’s true)

People seem to be spilling out of their clothing lately, and for some reason they think that’s okay.

But, it’s not.

Creating a trend to push people into buying is not the only way.  As a matter of fact some of the most exciting fashion “trends” actually originated in society, based on an authentic sign of the times.

The 70’s were a shining example. People didn’t wait for “Punk” to appear on the pages of Vogue before they sought it out. The clothing was part of a bigger, cultural movement before it became “The Punk Look.” It was completely organic before it was pursued, embraced, and ultimately devoured by a generation starved for something unique and different.

Another obvious example was “Deconstruction,” or “Grunge.” The movement, initially, had nothing to do with fashion, but everything to do with music and culture and a severe socioeconomic backlash that was sweeping the world.

Speaking of sweeping the world…have you met the Millennials? They’re young, influential, and sitting in various positions on the current socioeconomic pyramid: Some have more money than they know what to do with (Yummies), and others can’t seem to find a job…even with a very expensive University degree in their pocket. But regardless of their position they’re demanding and consuming everything, even (sadly) the skin-tight trends.

But it’s also because of this that the world seems to be on the brink of real change. And it’s important to notice again how THIS is what can propel people, and therefore fashion, forward.

So turn off your smart phones, shut your magazines, and take to the streets. If you do you’ll see that a compelling mixture of volume, athletic luxury and urban flavor now embodies an evolution of fashion design that hasn’t really been done before.

Today, the architecture of clothing has taken center stage. “Volume,” in fashion, might sound intimidating, but it’s not. Volume, done correctly, will enable you to feel comfortable, but look interesting and impeccable. It’s not about larger sizes or cuts of clothing, it’s about moving fabric away from the body. It’s about evoking a bit of mystery. And in this world, obsessed with fast and furious consumption, where almost nothing is sacred, mystery can be a very good thing.

Additionally, athletic influence in fashion has become a legitimate game changer. Where blazers and jeans and yoga pants held court, athletic influenced jackets, shorts and pants are taking over. Pieces are being created to be comfortable, fashionable, acceptable, and ultimately coveted.

And all of this is reflected in an urban sensibility that has been woven so prevalently into our society today: In life, and music, and fashion…on the streets of New York and Paris and Milan.

What you find in the streets is not rhetoric…it’s life.

Haus Alkire jacket and skirt, Proenza Schouler top, Balenciaga sneaker

Haus Alkire jacket and skirt, Proenza Schouler top, Balenciaga sneaker

Haider Ackermann jacket, Proenza Schouler pant, Robert Clergerie shoe

Haider Ackermann jacket, Proenza Schouler pant, Robert Clergerie shoe

Bogden top, Long Journey pant, Roland Mouret shoe

Bogden top, Long Journey pant, Roland Mouret shoe

Piece d'Anarchive shorts and sweater, Balenciaga sneakers

Piece d’Anarchive shorts and sweater, Balenciaga sneakers